Expert opinion needed: Does this mean that my dad might be suffering from pancreatic cancer?

I need an expert’s opinion to help me interpret the medical terms used in my Dad’s recent CT scan report and explain to me what it might mean:

"- An i|l defined irregular outline soft tissue mass lesion is seen in relation to and indistinct from the superior wall of the 4lh part of the duodenum and duodenojejunal junction ,
about 2x4cm in dimensions .
– It is inseparable from the inner margin of the uncinate process of the pancreas and inferior
surface of the superior mesenteric artery .
– The SMV maintains a cleavage from the mass .
– No cystic nor calcifc changes .
– No significant lymph node enlargement .
– Mild dilatation of the stomach and the proximal duodenum is seen .
– The liver and spleen appear normal in size with homogenous texture.
– No focal solid or cystic lesion could be seen.
– Focal right liver lobe calcification is seen .
– The GB is normal in size and wall thickness
– No biliary tree dilatation .
– Pancreatic head , body and tail appear with in normal in size and density".

My questions:

1. What is meant by: "It is inseparable from the inner margin of the uncinate process of the pancreas"? Is it an indication of pancreatic cancer that has started to spread beyond the pancreas to the duodenum?

2. Where it says: "Pancreatic head , body and tail appear with in normal in size and density". Is this a promising sign that it might not be cancer of the pancreas, since the organ is described to be healthy?

3. A biopsy was performed twice, and in one of them the following was reported: "high-grade dysplasia" Does this mean necessarily indicate malignancy?

Some background info:

My dad is over seventy, has lost some weight, often constipated (in the past few months), experiences abdominal pain that is linked to eating. However, he is not showing any signs of jaundice or yellowing of the cornea and no back pain or nausea which I believe are some of the symptoms of pancreatic cancer. Also, Dad’s blood tests are all good and within normal range. No anemia detected and white blood cell count is also within normal. Not that I’m sure if this is relevant to this particular case.

We are currently in a transitive phase. We are trying to make an appointment with an overseas specialist for further tests but we haven’t heard from them yet. In the meantime, I would appreciate some clarification on the above-quoted segment of the CT scan and my three questions in particular. Any additional info is also welcome. I hope to hear from someone who really knows about this. Thank you!

One Response to “Expert opinion needed: Does this mean that my dad might be suffering from pancreatic cancer?”

  1. abijann Says:

    The duodenum is the first part of the small intestines.

    When you click on this site, go down pass where the
    picture Figure #1099 is. (This picture shows how
    the pancreas is surrounded partially by the intestines)
    There it explains the location of where the lesion is
    located:
    The head of the pancreas is lodged within the curve of
    the duodenum. It’s upper border is "overlapped" by the
    superior part of the duodenum. The angle of junction
    of the lower and left lateral borders froms a prolongation,
    termed the UNCINATE PROCESS. In the grove between
    the duodenum and the right lateral and lower borders in
    front are the anastomosing superior and inferior
    pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

    You can see that this is similar to what they have said
    in the test results. This is the "location" of the lesion
    ( abnormal tissue) or dysplasia (abnormal cells) that
    they found.

    If you want to see a better, more up close picture, you
    can click on this link:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncinate_process_of_pancreas
    Number 2…uncinate process of pancreas
    Number 12 is the duodenum

    They are calling this dysplasia. Abnormal tissue or cells
    are usually the first sign that it may turn into cancer…but
    it is not as yet. At least they are not stating that it is
    cancer, after the biopsy they did. Since they are stating
    it is high grade…it means that it really abnormal.

    I hope this is of some help. The biopsy would be more
    of a determination of the true diagnosis because they
    are looking at the actual tissue of the area and not just
    films (pictures) of it.